Apple Notes: How to Set Up Passwords for Privacy

Apple’s Notes app is a convenient way to follow checklists, articles, photos and more. The app is included by default on iOS devices, and your Apple ID makes it easy to sync all your notes.

If you use Notes as a journal or to keep track of more personal information, you’ll need an extra layer of protection from prying eyes. You probably have a password on your Apple device or Face ID, but did you know you can password protect your notes?

Here’s how to set it up on iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

How to Password Protect Notes on iPhone and iPad

1. Open the Notes app on your iPhone.
2. Start a new note or choose an existing note.
3. Tap the three dots at the top right.
4. Press the Lock button.
5. Create your password, retype it to verify it, and add a hint if you wish. You can also choose to enable Face ID or Touch ID instead.
6. Faucet Do.

Now when you open the Notes app, the note you password protected will show a little padlock icon next to the title. When you tap the note, a message reminds you that it’s locked and prompts you to enter your password.

How to Password Protect Notes on Mac

You can set up Touch ID to lock your notes.

Sarah Tew/CNET

1. Open the Notes app on your Mac.
2. Start a new note or choose an existing note.
3. Click the lock icon at the top right of the Notes app.
4. Click on Note on locking.
5.
Create your password, retype it to verify it, and add a hint if you wish.
6. Click on Set password.

Similar to the iOS version of Notes, the note you password protected will show up with a lock icon. You will need to enter your password to open the note.

Can I change my Notes password?

Yes, it just looks a bit different depending on the device you are using. When you initially lock a note, the same password will be applied to each locked note, unless otherwise specified in the settings (so make sure it’s a strong password!) Here’s what it does need to know :

iPhones and iPads

1. Open Settings on your device.
2. Scroll down and tap the Notes app in the left pane of the screen.
3. Tap Password.
4. From there, you can either press Change password Where Reset password.

macos-notes-change password

On a Mac, you can reset the Notes app password through the app’s preferences.

Shelby Brown/CNET

Mac

1. Open the Notes app on your Mac.
2. Click Notes in the upper left corner.
3. Click Preferences.
4. From there you can choose Change password Where Reset password.

Can I use Touch ID or Face ID to lock my notes?

Yes, but make sure you have already set up Touch ID on your device. If you’re setting up your Notes password for the first time, you can choose Touch ID or Face ID instead of entering a password. Here’s how to add Touch ID or Face ID as a secondary option for locked notes:

iPhones and iPads

1. Open Settings on your iPhone.
2. Find and open the Remarks application.
3. Faucet Password.
4. Enable Use Touch ID. Now when you try to open a locked note, you are prompted to use your fingerprint or enter a password. Just follow the steps again to turn it off.

For Face ID, follow these steps but enable Use Face ID In place.

Mac

1. Open the Remarks app on your Mac.
2. Click on Remarks in the upper left corner.
3. Click on Preferences.
4.
Check the Use Touch ID under the Change Password and Reset Password buttons.

gettyimages-1090899154

Notes is easy to use and comes standard on Apple devices.

NurPhoto/Getty images

Can I remove a lock on a note?

Yes, but be aware that if you remove a lock on a note, it will apply to all Apple devices you are signed in to with that ID. Here’s how it breaks down for iPhone, iPad, and Mac:

iPhones and iPads

1. Open the Notes app on your iPhone.
2. Select a locked note that you want to unlock.
3. Enter your password, use Face ID or Touch ID.
4. Press the After button.
5. Picking out Remove (you should no longer see a padlock icon on the note now).

Mac

1. Open the Notes app on your Mac.
2. Click the lock icon in the upper left corner.
3. Click on Remove Lock.
4.
Type your password.
5. Click on OKAY.

To find out more, see CNET’s favorite to-do lists for better organization and our favorite iOS 15 features you may have missed.

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